Best writers. Best papers. Let professionals take care of your academic papers

Order a similar paper and get 15% discount on your first order with us
Use the following coupon "FIRST15"
ORDER NOW

Karl Marx’s Definition of Industrial Society Industrialization resulted in the simplification of the European social order. The dramatic economic transformations of the 18th and 19th centuries reduce

Karl Marx’s Definition of Industrial Society

Industrialization resulted in the simplification of the European social order. The dramatic economic transformations of the 18th and 19th centuries reduced the European class structure to three classes:

· The bourgeoisie: industrial capitalists who owned the means of production

· The middle class: educated men who managed the means of production

· The proletariat: the masses of working class who sell their labor

According to Marx however, industrialization was splitting society as whole into only two classes,—the bourgeoisie and proletariat. As he explained, “the lower strata of the middle class—small trades-people, shopkeepers, handicraftsmen—sink gradually into the proletariat, partly because their diminutive capital does not suffice for the scale on which modern industry is carried on, and is swamped in the competition with the large capitalists, partly because their specialized skill is rendered worthless” by the mechanization inherent to industrialization. Marx further argued that these two camps were extremely hostile because the bourgeoisie (who were capitalists exploiting the factors of production to maximize profit) institutionalized the oppression of the proletariat.

Critical Thinking Questions:

1. Explain modern Europe’s social class structure according to Karl Marx.

2. How does industrialization lead to only two social classes?

3. Remembering Marx’s definition of history, explain the characteristics of the relationship between these two classes?

3. Phase One of the Proletariat Revolution: the Luddites

According to Marx, the problems faced by the proletariat were a direct result of capitalism. Marx further felt that the working classes of industrial society would eventually tire of being oppressed and therefore destroy the capitalist economic system that benefited only the bourgeoisie. Marx believed that this proletariat revolution would evolve in stages, and the Luddites exemplified the first phase. During this initial phase, the proletariat does not direct their attacks at the bourgeoisie itself—they do not stage a revolution against the bourgeoisie. Instead, they direct their aggression “against the instruments of production themselves; they destroy the imported wares that compete with their labor, they smash to pieces machinery, they set factories ablaze…” In short, the skilled working class tried to restore their position in European society by destroying the factories, machines, and products that rendered their skills obsolete.

Critical Thinking Questions:

1. Explain the causes of the proletariat revolution.

 
ORDER THIS PAPER OR A SIMILAR ONE WITH GEEKY WRITING TUTORS AND GET AN AMAZING DISCOUNT"